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Helping Instagram offer new ways to verify age

Helping Instagram offer new ways to verify age

If someone in the US changes their date of birth on Instagram from under the age of 18, to 18 or over, they are required to verify their age. Starting today, Yoti’s facial age estimation will be one of three options people  will have to do this. The other two will be by uploading an ID document and social vouching. These are both powered by Meta.  Meta’s approach to age verification In 2019, Instagram began asking people to provide their age when signing up for the platform. Since then, they’ve continued to ask people for their birthday and have made this a requirement to get a full picture of how old people are on Instagram. Knowing how old everyone is allows them to provide different experiences to different age groups, specifically teens.  When they know if someone is a teen (13-17), they can default them into age-appropriate privacy settings, prevent unwanted contact from adults they don’t know, and limit the options advertisers have to reach them with ads. Many people, including young people, may misrepresent how old they are online, whether by mistake,  because they don’t want to share their age, or because they want to access services not meant for them. Some companies have turned to government issued identity documents or credit card checks to verify age but many people, particularly teens, don’t have access to these forms of ID. The addition of Yoti’s age estimation technology to the existing range of solutions offered by Meta means users will be provided with more equitable options to verify age that protect peoples’ privacy.  A privacy-preserving way to verify age Meta will be using Yoti’s age estimation technology as one option to verify age. Yoti’s technology has been trained to estimate age by looking at facial features in an image. It was built to give everyone a secure and private way of proving how old they are. It doesn’t require any personal details or documents, and it has no way of linking a name or an identity to an image.  Yoti’s facial age estimation is built in accordance with the ‘privacy by design’ principle in the UK GDPR. No individual can be identified by the model and it encourages data minimisation because it only needs a facial image. The image is only used for the purpose of estimating age. Once a result is given, the image is instantly deleted.  How Yoti’s age estimation works on Instagram If someone chooses to verify their age with Yoti, they will see instructions on screen to take a video selfie. After they take the selfie, Meta shares only the image with Yoti. No other details are shared. The image is analysed by AI that has been trained to estimate age. To the technology, the image is simply a pattern of pixels, and the pixels are numbers. Our facial age estimation technology has been trained to spot patterns in numbers, so it learns ‘this pattern is what 16 year olds usually look like’. The estimated age is then shared with Meta. After this, both Meta and Yoti delete the image. Yoti’s age estimation technology can’t recognise identity – just age, so it does all of this without ever learning who anyone is. Yoti does not use these images to train the AI further. Yoti’s age estimation technology has performed over 500 million checks worldwide, and is being used by a range of businesses and industries around the world including social media, gaming and age restricted e-commerce. Learn more about Yoti’s age estimation technology and how it can help to provide age appropriate products and services.

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How Yoti can help you provide age appropriate experiences online

How Yoti can help you provide age appropriate experiences online

Online service providers are increasingly being called upon to provide age appropriate experiences for their younger users. To do so effectively, service providers need to know the age of their users to make sure they’re providing the right experiences. Why are age appropriate experiences important? The ICO’s Children’s Code, originating in the UK, is driving a global movement to ensure children are able to enjoy online interaction ‘age appropriately’. A growing number of countries around the world are already reviewing legislation for a range of age restricted goods and services, particularly age assurance for online services. Specific initiatives are being developed, with the Californian Age-Appropriate Design Code Act in the US, the EU’s Digital Services Act, and the Online Safety Bill in the UK. Adult content sites are also using Yoti age estimation successfully to prevent children from accessing their websites What are age appropriate experiences?  Child safety and protection is the significant factor here. They range from ensuring age appropriate interaction for children, protection against detrimental content and grooming, and supporting age appropriate content moderation. The ICO defines the code as applying to all service providers that have children access their services. This includes:  Social media Streaming services Online gaming Chat rooms Forums Apps  So how can Yoti help? For a long time, the discussion around age verification has centred on the practicality, effectiveness and cost of implementing such a solution. However, technical solutions have now been developed that are scalable, global and affordable for operators. For example, Yoti’s age estimation is the most privacy-preserving, quickest method of age assurance; it is a global, popular way for service providers to determine age from an image or selfie. Our experience has shown that given the option of age verification methods, around 4 in 5 users choose to use Yoti’s age estimation. Learn more about Yoti’s  age estimation and age verification solutions or get in touch for a demo.

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Future plans for Right to Work and Right to Rent guidance

Future plans for Right to Work and Right to Rent guidance

In December 2021, the Home Office announced that from April 6th, there would be changes to the guidance for completing right to work and right to rent checks.  Advice was amended at the start of the pandemic to allow right to work checks to be performed via a video call – following feedback from organisations, this temporary guidance has been extended until September 30th.  The updated Right to Work guidance will come into effect on 6th April, a new scheme under the Department of Culture, Media and Sport Identity and Attributes Trust Framework. The aim is to develop the market for digital identities, and engender trust in businesses and citizens to enable this future-focused, more efficient way of proving identity.  You will still be able to continue using video calls to complete checks – this temporary adjustment has been deferred until September 30th 2022.  However, the big change is that you will be able to accept digital remote checks from April 6th. There is a certification process being undertaken at the moment and Yoti, in partnership with Post Office, is actively undergoing its own certification.  So, how can I now perform right to work checks and ensure I’m meeting the guidelines? Video calls are still allowed until September 30th 2022 Physically checking a candidate’s document on day 1 and taking a copy is still valid From April 6, you can use a digital identity provider Read more about how our unique partnership with Post Office can help you with right to work and right to rent checks.

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Yoti is speeding up KYC for Gamesys online casinos and bingo

Yoti is speeding up KYC for Gamesys online casinos and bingo

Leading gaming operator Gamesys Group is transforming the registration experience with  Yoti’s document scanning and verification product Doc Scan. Doc Scan will be embedded into Gamesys’ bingo and casino game sites. Yoti’s Doc Scan is simple yet robust for businesses and customers alike, offering seamless identity checking with our award-winning technology under the hood. Together, we’ll help people register faster, while helping Gamesys tackle fraud and comply with the Gambling Commissions players safety rules.  Doc Scan makes it easy for customers to prove their identity without compromising on security. It helps businesses complete know-your-customer (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) checks around the globe, accepting 1,000s of ID documents from 200+ countries – providing a full check report for audit trails and compliance. Simon Mizzi, Marketing Director of Gamesys said: “This partnership with Yoti is a double win for Gamesys. Not only does it enhance the already strong processes that we have in place but it demonstrates our determination to understand and care for our customers and to provide them with the most enjoyable experience within a secure environment”. For individuals, using Doc Scan is as simple as taking a photo of their government-approved ID document and a photo of themselves. Yoti brings biometric liveness and face matching, accurate data extraction and document authenticity checks by our 24/7 expert security centres to ensure a frictionless experience and a high-level of assurance. John Abbott, Chief Business Officer at Yoti said “We’re delighted to be working with Gamesys to make the gaming experience better for players. Gamesys share our commitment to building trust between businesses and consumers – and together we provide a simple, private and secure way for people to prove their identity for Gamesys powered games.” Seamless integration takes just a few hours into websites or apps thanks to our wide-ranging support for major development languages and easy-to-use plugins. With checks start as little as £0.25, Doc Scan can help you transform the KYC process for your customers and business.

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Yoti accepted on the government's G-Cloud Framework

Yoti accepted on the government's G-Cloud Framework

Yoti is pleased to announce that it has once again been approved to list services under the Crown Commercial Services G-Cloud framework. G-Cloud allows UK public sector bodies to choose and buy cloud computing services without the need for a lengthy procurement process. It provides a quick and easy route to market, access to the latest technology and reduced cost of ownership. Since its inception in 2012 there has been £4.72bn worth of sales through the framework with 45% of the spend awarded to SMEs. A range of Yoti services, covering identity verification, authentication, e-signing and age estimation are now available, via the digital marketplace on G-Cloud 11. To find out more about the Yoti services on offer visit the Digital Marketplace or contact Gav Watts at gavin.watts@yoti.com. Founded in 2014, we are on a mission to become the world’s trusted identity platform. Our free digital identity app, with over 4.5 million downloads, is the new, safer way to prove your age online, check out faster with age-restricted items at supermarkets and save time and money proving your identity to businesses. It brings safer connections with the people you meet online as well as enabling secure website login with your biometrics instead of remembering passwords.

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Yoti trials blockchain in property transactions with HM Land Registry

Yoti trials blockchain in property transactions with HM Land Registry

London, UK, 17th April 2019 – As part of HM Land Registry’s Digital Street research and development project, digital identity company Yoti has worked with the organisation and other partners on a blockchain prototype to show how buying and selling a house can be made simpler and quicker by demonstrating a digital transfer of ownership.  The sale of a semi-detached house in Gillingham, Kent, was used to show how the emerging technology could be used to reduce uncertainty and delays when buying a home. Stefan, the seller of the house in Gillingham who took part in the trial, said “It was pretty straightforward. If that’s the way forward, it’s going to make everything easier.”  The blockchain technology was developed through conversations with stakeholders across the property market, and tested with close cooperation of Mishcon de Reya, Premier Property Lawyers, Barclays and ShieldPay. Yoti provided the digital identity component of the HM Land Registry (HMLR) electronic title deed transfer project. Throughout the property transaction process, it is essential to identify all participants at each point of progress to ensure protection against fraud and money laundering. Yoti’s secure digital identity enabled the buyers and sellers to safely prove who they were throughout the transaction, resulting in a safe and secure completion. As each organisation that services a property transaction is required to identify property buying and selling customers, Yoti interacted with the entire value chain from mortgage lender to conveyancer to HMLR. One of the biggest pain points in the property transaction process, as it exists today, is the mix of methodologies used to identify and engage with buyers and sellers across each organisation that services the transaction. Estate agents, mortgage lenders, and conveyancing solicitors are all required to formally identify the participants in a property transaction, yet their customers need to go through multiple identity verification processes to achieve this. Some of these processes involve insecure and easily defrauded practices such as posting documents, emailing document images, and in-person document checks by untrained staff.  By creating a reusable biometrically verified Yoti digital identity, buyers and sellers are able to prove who they are safely and securely multiple times across an entire transaction cycle using their smartphone.  Simon Charnock, Commercial Director at Yoti said, “It’s great to see HMLR working hard to show how technology can make the property transaction process easier and quicker for all of us. This has been a hugely collaborative project and by encouraging participation from private organisations, HMLR are driving innovation and value in the property sector. It’s exciting to think that buying or selling a home could become a digitised proposition using blockchain and Yoti’s digital identity technology in the future.”

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